Dada sucks my Nipple its Claustrophobic Between your Noun

Reblogged on WordPress.com

Source: Dada sucks my Nipple its Claustrophobic Between your Noun

(My) Asperger’s / autism and trust  – the silent wave

 

Once upon a time, I trusted everyone.  The cashier at the grocery store was the perfect audience for a monologue about my rock collection.  When I got my hair styled for Grade 2 school pictures, th…[ ]

Source: (My) Asperger’s / autism and trust  – the silent wave

From Knowledge to Understanding: or, why Truth is Unimportant in Philosophy

In Reason in Philosophy, Robert Brandom devotes an essay to justifying the claim that truth is not important in philosophy. This is something of a jarring claim, and when I first read it, I wasn’t quite sure what to make of it. Having read it a few times over, I now think there is a lot of potentially fruitful ground mapped out by Brandom, whose overall goal here is to deflate notions of truth where truth is a property that does explanatory work. Brandom takes this to be something of a grammatical confusion, since saying that X is true looks a lot like predicating a property of X. Truth here has both a practical role – Brandom thinks that for the philosophical tradition, truth is basically how one gets what one wants, since true beliefs guarantee the success of our every day undertakings – and a more ‘constitutive’ role, where truth is what separates us from the animals.

Source: From Knowledge to Understanding: or, why Truth is Unimportant in Philosophy

An analysis of AS YOU LIKE IT (Shakespeare) by Dr. Joseph Suglia / Transgender in Shakespeare / 

Transgenderism in Shakespeare / Shakespeare Transgender / Transgender AS YOU LIKE IT / Shakespeare Transgender

An analysis of AS YOU LIKE IT (Shakespeare) by Dr. Joseph Suglia

“Aimer grandement quelqu’un c’est le render inépuisable.”

—Paul Valéry, Cahiers (1944. Sans titre, XXVIII, 524)

In the wrestling match between Nature and Fortune, it is Fortune that chokeholds her opponent and flattens her on the mat.

Source: An analysis of AS YOU LIKE IT (Shakespeare) by Dr. Joseph Suglia / Transgender in Shakespeare / Transgenderism in Shakespeare / Shakespeare Transgender / Transgender AS YOU LIKE IT / Shakespeare Transgender

The Nativity Through Abrahamic Literature: Part 9: Perspectives Of A Fellow Traveler

 

The Light of the New Born Jesus: Latin Infancy Gospel, Arundel Manuscript

The following is post number 9 in my series, “The Nativity Through Abrahamic Literature”. This post centers around some of the unique qualities of the new born Jesus. It comes from the Latin Infancy Gospel, Arundel Manuscript, from the book, The Other Bible Edited by Willis Barnestone

“I, however, stood stupefied and amazed. Awe grasped me. I was gazing intently at the fantastically bright light that had been born. The light, however, after a while, shrank, imitated the shape of an infant, then immediately became outwardly an infant in the usual manner of born infants. I became bold and leaned over and touched him. I lifted him in my hands with great awe, and I was terrified because he had no weight like other babies who were born. I looked at him closely; there was no blemish on him, but he was in his body totally shining, just as the dew of the most high God. He was light to carry, splendid to see. For a while I was amazed at him because he did not cry as newborn children are supposed to. While I beheld him, looking into his face, he laughed at me with a most joyful laugh, and, opening his eyes, he looked intently at me. Suddenly, a great light came forth from his eyes like a great flash of lightning.”

 

Source: The Nativity Through Abrahamic Literature: Part 9: The Light of the New Born Jesus: Latin Infancy Gospel, Arundel Manuscript | Perspectives Of A Fellow Traveler

Bread tags buy wheelchairs for people in need | Northern Star

CASINO couple Tony and Carol Tomek’s favourite bread is wholemeal and just by recycling the tags from the loaves they buy they will be helping provide wheelchairs for people who can’t afford to purchase them.

Ms Tomek said she had heard about someone collecting bread tags to help buy wheelchairs so she started saving them and then turned to the internet for help.

“I love being able to recycle where I can so I googled for some more information,” she said.

Ms Tomek’s search revealed a woman in South Africa named Mary Honeybun who has been collecting bread tags since 2006 and has so far provided 385 wheelchairs to those who need them.

Ms Honeybun sends more than 400kg of plastic bread tags to a recycling centre every six weeks.

“What she does is cleans and sorts all the tags and then delivers them to a polystyrene recycling plant,” Ms Tomek said.

The tags are then melted down to make picture frames, skirtings, cornices, seedling trays, coat hangers and much more.

The Rotary Wheelchair Foundation has helped Ms Honeybun source good-quality affordable wheelchairs with the proceeds.

“We don’t eat much bread, about two loaves a week, but there may be families out there who live on bread and want to do something with the tags,” Ms Tomek said.

“There would be plenty of community groups, schools and churches who use bread and for the cost of postage, are able to re-use and recycle the tags for a worthy cause.”

To recycle your bread tags, post them to Mary Honeybun, PO Box 215, Noordhoek, 7979, South Africa – or become a collecting point for your network to save on postage.

Lismore Northern Star
Blue Mountains Franciscan Church has a bundle ready to go over now!!!!!