Derwent Water – Lake District

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A panoramic view of Derwentwater from Cat Bells on the western side
By Diliff – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7318772
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References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g McNamara, Jane, Table of lake factsEnvironment Agency of England and Wales, archived from the original on 28 June 2009, retrieved 13 November 2007
  2. ^ “Ice Age fish thrives in new home”BBC News. 27 February 2008. Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  3. ^ “Extinct fish found in the Lake District after millions is spent on clean-up work”.
  4. ^ Whaley, Diana (2006). A dictionary of Lake District place-names. Nottingham: English Place-Name Society. pp. lx, 423 p.95. ISBN 0904889726.
  5. ^ Whaley, 2006, p.422
  6. ^ “Hundred Year Stone”Peter Randall-Page. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  7. ^ “The National Trust Centenary Stone from Keswick”WalkLakes. Retrieved 7 August 2019.

Overview

Derwentwater, or Derwent Water, is one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District National Park in north west England. It lies wholly within the Borough of Allerdale, in the county of Cumbria.

The lake occupies part of Borrowdale and lies immediately south of the town of Keswick. It is both fed and drained by the River Derwent. It measures approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and is some 72 feet (22 m) deep. There are several islands within the lake, one of which is inhabited. Derwent Island House, an 18th-century residence, is a tenanted National Trust property open to the public on five days each year .

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Derwentwater is a place of considerable scenic value. It is surrounded by hills (known locally as fells), and many of the slopes facing Derwentwater are extensively wooded. A regular passenger launch operates on the lake, taking passengers between various landing stages. There are seven lakeside marinas, the most popular stops being Keswick, Portinscale and the Lodore Falls, from which boats may be hired. Recreational walking is a major tourist activity in the area and there is an extensive network of footpaths in the hills and woods surrounding the lake.

The Keswick to Borrowdale road runs along the eastern shore of the lake and carries a regular bus service. There is a lesser, or unclassified, road along the western shore connecting the villages of Grange and Portinscale.

Derwentwater gave its name to the Earldom of Derwentwater.

From 2008 to 2014, the lake was believed to be the last remaining native habitat of the vendace (Coregonus vandesius) fish from the four originally known sites: Bassenthwaite Lake and Derwentwater in the Lake District, and the Castle Loch & Mill Loch in Lochmaben.[2] However, a breeding population was discovered at Bassenthwaite Lake by conservationists in September 2014.[3]

This page was last edited on 31 January 2021, at 12:54 (UTC).
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Bing Selection this session is The Lake district

web captured image “View over Derwent Water in the Lake District – from Bing search engine. 2021. derwentwater-Bing. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.bing.com/search?q=derwentwater&filters=IsConversation:%22True%22+BTWLKey:%22DerwentwaterEngland%22+BTWLType:%22Trivia%22&FORM=EMSDS0. [Accessed 11 February 2021].