Da Vinci-last supper

The Last Supper (Italian: Il Cenacolo [il tʃeˈnaːkolo] or L’Ultima Cena [ˈlultima ˈtʃeːna]) is a late 15th-century mural painting by Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci housed by the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Italy. It is one of the Western world’s most recognizable paintings.
A preparatory study from da Vinci’s notebooks

A study for The Last Supper[b] from Leonardo’s notebooks shows twelve apostles, nine of which are identified by names written above their heads. Judas sits on the opposite side of the table, as in earlier depictions of the scene.[15]

The work is assumed to have been started around 1495–96 and was commissioned as part of a plan of renovations to the church and its convent buildings by Leonardo’s patron Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. The painting represents the scene of the Last Supper of Jesus with his apostles, as it is told in the Gospel of John, 13:21.[2] Leonardo has depicted the consternation that occurred among the Twelve Apostles when Jesus announced that one of them would betray him.

Due to the methods used, a variety of environmental factors, and intentional damage, little of the original painting remains today despite numerous restoration attempts, the last being completed in 1999.

Two early copies of The Last Supper are known to exist, presumed to be work by Leonardo’s assistants. The copies are almost the size of the original, and have survived with a wealth of original detail still intact.[20] One, by Giampietrino, is in the collection of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, and the other, by Cesare da Sesto, is installed at the Church of St. Ambrogio in Ponte Capriasca, Switzerland. A third copy (oil on canvas) is painted by Andrea Solari (c. 1520) and is on display in the Leonardo da Vinci Museum of the Tongerlo Abbey, Belgium.

The Last Supper, c. 1520, by Giampietrino, oil on canvas, in the collection of the Royal Academy of Arts, London.[c] This full-scale copy was the main source for the 1978–1998 restoration of the original. It includes several lost details such as Christ’s feet and the salt cellar spilled by Judas. Giampietrino is thought to have worked closely with Leonardo when he was in Milan.

The Last Supper, c. 1520, Andrea Solari, oil on canvas, in the Leonardo da Vinci Museum, Tongerlo Abbey

Compiled by Andrew Blair using a selection from this article on Wikipedia – more information at https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Supper_(Leonardo)