HUBBLE USES COSMIC LENS TO DISCOVER MOST DISTANT STAR EVER OBSERVED [HEIC1807]

02 April 2018

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found the most distant star ever discovered. The hot blue star existed only 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang. This discovery provides new insight into the formation and evolution of stars in the early Universe, the constituents of galaxy clusters and also on the nature of dark matter.

Appearance of the most distant star. Credit: NASA & ESA and P. Kelly (University of California, Berkeley)

 

The international team, led by Patrick Kelly (University of Minnesota, USA), Jose Diego (Instituto de Física de Cantabria, Spain) and Steven Rodney (University of South Carolina, USA), discovered the distant star in the galaxy cluster MACS J1149-2223 in April 2016. The observations with Hubble were actually performed in order to detect and follow the latest appearance of the gravitationally lensed supernova explosion nicknamed “Refsdal” (heic1525[1], when an unexpected point source brightened in the same galaxy that hosted the supernova.

Like the Refsdal supernova explosion the light of this distant star got magnified, making it visible for Hubble, says Patrick Kelly. This star is at least 100 times farther away than the next individual star we can study, except for supernova explosions.” [   ]

Source: http://sci.esa.int/hubble/60140-hubble-uses-cosmic-lens-to-discover-most-distant-star-ever-observed-heic1807/

 

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29 March 2018

A colourful design capturing the essence of ESA’s CHEOPS mission, which will measure the size of planets as they cross in front of their parent stars, has been selected for the rocket carrying the satellite into space.  [  ]

 

Source: http://sci.esa.int/cheops/60128-winning-exoplanet-rocket-sticker-selected/